Categories
Archives
Please donate any amount you can to help us try to recover legal costs in defending liberty and the right of free speech !

Posts Tagged ‘Border Fence’

Arizona Lawmakers Say They Will Build Border Fence


Arizona is taking on immigration once again, with lawmakers collecting donations from the public to put a fence along every inch of the state’s border with Mexico. It is an unprecedented effort by a state that is the busiest U.S. gateway for both illegal immigrants and marijuana.

The idea came from state Senator Steve Smith, a Republican who says people from across the nation have donated about $255,000 to the project since the state in July launched a website that urges visitors to “show the world the resolve and the can-do spirit of the American people.”

Smith acknowledges he has a long way to go. The $255,000 will barely cover a half mile of fencing. Smith estimates that the total supplies alone will cost $34 million, or about $426,000 a mile.

The fence is Arizona’s latest attempt to force a debate on whether the U.S. government is doing enough to stop illegal immigration. A judge suspended key provisions of the state’s contentious immigration bill, and Gov. Jan Brewer is appealing to the U.S. Supreme Court to get them reinstated. Brewer also signed the fencing bill.Critics of the private fence plan say the idea is a misguided approach that will prove to be ineffective and hugely expensive. They point to the billions of dollars spent by the federal government to build fencing that hasn’t stopped illegal immigration.
Smugglers often circumvent the barriers by cutting or driving through them, climbing over them, launching drugs with catapults over them, or digging tunnels under them. In the last week alone, two drug tunnels were found in Nogales in southeastern Arizona.
But Smith and other supporters don’t care.
They say the federal government has done little to secure the border and that additional fencing will close gaps exploited by smugglers and illegal immigrants. Even if the fence isn’t completed, Smith and others believe the project will send a message to Washington.
They have found support for the idea from some U.S. Border Patrol agents.
“I take my hat off to them,” says George McCubbin, apresident of the National Border Patrol Council, the agency’s union. “I don’t believe it’s the state’s responsibility, but by them attempting this, they will continue to have this problem brought out, and hopefully someone will take notice of it.”
Although he praises the effort, McCubbin thinks building more border fencing is “a waste of time.”
“A fence slows down traffic. It doesn’t stop it,” he says. “You need to put your money in effective resources that you know will work.”
He believes the U.S. government needs to crack down on employers who hire illegal immigrants, increase penalties against those caught in the country illegally, cut off social services for others 1and put more agents at the border.
The project’s first priority is to build fences at busy border-crossing points. Other plans include constructing fences along the 80 miles of border where none currently exist.
Fencing currently covers about 650 miles, or one-third, of the 2,000-mile U.S.-Mexico border.
Nearly half is in Arizona, with the rest equally divided among California, New Mexico and Texas.
Existing border fencing varies in quality from simple barbed wire or vehicle barriers to carefully engineered, 18- to 30-foot-high fences.
On top of $2.5 billion spent by the federal government to build the fence, a government report projects it will cost another $6.5 billion over the next 20 years to maintain.
Despite the relatively low amount of money raised so far, Smith says work will begin sometime next year.
“Something will be in the ground by 2012,” he says.

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/us/2011/11/24/arizona-lawmakers-say-will-build-border-fence/#ixzz1flBaetMI

Help Arizona today

If everyone puts in one dollar

ARIZONA WILL BUILD THAT BORDER FENCE

 

https://az.gov/app/keepazsafe/index.xhtml

 

Welcome to the Keep AZ Safe Donation Application

Amounts represent Website contributions only, mail-in contributions are not included in these totals.

34,016

people have donated

$1,569,714.13

donations collected

Currently Arizona faces many legal challenges to its recently passed laws dealing with border security and immigration. Arizona is proud to defend these laws which are aimed at protecting its citizens and the great State of Arizona and will be very aggressive in their defense.

If you would like to contribute to Arizona, please review the section below listing the items you will need and click the “I Want to Donate” button.

Thank you.

Before Starting This Application You Will Need the Following Items.

  • Valid Visa, MasterCard, American Express or Discover Card
  • Valid Email Address
  • Access to a Printer

Please Note

  • The State of Arizona provides no opinion as to whether donations to the Border Security and Immigration Legal Defense fund are deductible for federal income tax purposes. A donor may wish to consult a tax professional for advice.
  • All donations collected through this website will be deposited into the Border Security and Immigration Legal Defense fund to be used by Arizona on Border Security and Immigration matters.
  • No campaign or reelection contributions are accepted through this website.

 

 

Arizona seeks online donations to build Border Fence

By PAUL DAVENPORT, Associated Press

Arizona lawmakers want more fence along the border with Mexico — whether the federal government thinks it’s necessary or not.

They’ve got a plan that could get a project started using online donations and prison labor. If they get enough money, all they would have to do is get cooperation from landowners and construction could begin as soon as this year.

Gov. Jan Brewer recently signed a bill that sets the state on a course that begins with launching a website to raise money for the work, said state Sen. Steve Smith, the bill’s sponsor.

“We’re going to build this site as fast as we can, and promote it, and market the heck out of it,” said Smith, a first-term Republican senator from Maricopa.

Arizona — strapped for cash and mired in a budget crisis — is already using public donations to pay for its legal defense of the SB1070 illegal immigration law.

Part of the marketing pitch for donations could include providing certificates declaring that individual contributors “helped build the Arizona wall,” Smith said. “I think it’s going to be a really, really neat thing.”

Construction would start “after we’ve raised a significant amount of money first” but possibly as soon as later this year, Smith said.

“If the website is up and there is an overwhelming response to what we’ve done and millions of dollars in this fund, I would see no reason why engineering or initial construction or finalized plans can’t be accomplished,” he said.

The nearly 2,000-mile U.S.-Mexico border already has about 650 miles of fence of one type or another, nearly half of it in Arizona. The state’s 376-mile border is the busiest gateway for both illegal immigrants and marijuana smuggling.

Department of Homeland Security spokesman Matthew Chandler said federal officials declined to comment on the Arizona legislation.

State Corrections Director Charles Ryan said getting inmate labor to help construct border fencing wouldn’t be a problem.

Minimum-security prisoners already have been used to clear brush in immigrants’ hiding spots near the border and clean up trash and other material dumped by border-crossers, he said.

Work crews of Arizona inmates also have been used to refurbish public buildings, build sidewalks and construct park facilities.

At 50 cents an hour, “we are a relatively inexpensive labor force,” Ryan said. “If we have the funding to do it, we’re capable of doing it.”

Arizona’s existing border security fund is being used to pay for legal costs of defending SB1070 in court, though Brewer’s 2010 executive order creating the fund allows its money to be used for any “border security purpose.” A federal judge has blocked implementation of key parts of SB1070, but Brewer has said she’ll take the case to the U.S. Supreme Court if necessary.

The fund through Wednesday has received nearly 44,000 donations totaling more than $3.7 million, collected online and through mailed donations since May 2010. Roughly half of the money has been spent, and Brewer spokesman Matthew Benson said the balance is also needed for SB1070-related legal expenses.

Smith and other supporters of the border-fence legislation haven’t produced any cost estimates for the state project, saying only that the state should be able to do it far more inexpensively than the federal government.

That still could be put the state’s costs in the tens of millions of dollars — or more.

A 2009 report by Congress’ Government Accountability Office said costs of federal fencing work to keep out people on foot ranged from $400,000 to $15.1 million per mile, while costs for vehicle barriers ranged from $200,000 to $1.8 million. Costs varied by such things as types of fencing geography, land costs and labor expenses, the report said.

Brewer signed the Arizona fence bill on April 28, and it will take effect with most other new state laws on July 20.

It took the bill about 2 1/2 months to land on her desk, easily winning approval on party-line votes during a legislative session dominated by budget-balancing work

During committee hearings and floor debates, Republicans said the state has a legal and moral obligation to take action because the federal government hasn’t done enough to secure the border.

“My constituents want this thing fixed and fixed once and for all, and we’re going to do it,” Republican Sen. Al Melvin of Tucson said during a February committee hearing. “People should not be dying in the desert.”

Democrats questioned the project’s feasibility and called it a feel-good distraction from pressing for more comprehensive action on border and immigration issues.

“If we are here to pass symbolic legislation and not really address border security, SB1406 does the job. But people don’t benefit from symbolic legislation,” Democratic Rep. Catherine Miranda of Phoenix said April 18 House vote.

Under the bill, the border fencing work could be done either in conjunction with other border states or by Arizona alone.

Smith said the committee will consider where to build the fence and what kind of fence is needed.

But the eventual choice could be like double- and triple-fence barriers already installed along the border in Yuma County in southwestern Arizona because they appear to block crossings, he said.

Any type of fence would require approval of landowners, but Smith said he expects that to be forthcoming from the state and private land owners, including ranchers who have complained of break-ins and other trouble associated with smugglers and illegal crossings.

Individual ranchers likely will cooperate with the state fencing project, just as they have done with federal officials on placing helipads, watering stations and communications equipment to help officers patrolling the border, an Arizona Cattle Growers Association official said.

However, the 1,100-member association didn’t take a position on the fence bill, said Executive Director Patrick Bray.

“We certainly appreciate the efforts put into this legislation, however the funding is a huge question. It’s an empty solution because we don’t know where the money is going to come from.”

Bray added: “We want to stay focused on the overall border security issue. At this point we are looking for a more comprehensive security approach rather than this pieces that might come to fruition.”

GO TO – https://az.gov/app/keepazsafe/index.xhtml

 

Please donate any amount you can to help us try to recover legal costs in defending liberty and the right of free speech !